Can Rabbits Eat Blueberries? Small Tasty Treats For Bunnies

blueberry background

Rabbits are one of the many pets that you can safely give to your kids simply because these animals are quite timid and friendly. They need very little maintenance and they would just stay happy for as long as they are given enough care and attention, which I’m sure that your kids might be very happy to oblige.

Rabbits are also known to require very little when it comes to their dietary needs. For as long they have a constant supply of fresh hay or green grasses and clean water, they can stay healthy and happy for a long time. Rabbits can also eat treats, however, you need to be very careful when choosing them.

This is why whenever you are going to let your kids play with them, you have to make sure that they won’t be giving the rabbits treats that can be harmful to them. If you want to be sure, you can actually try to give your kids fruit pieces like 1 or 2 blueberries so they can play and give treats to their pets.

Can Rabbits Eat Blueberries? Small Tasty Treats For Bunnies

Can Rabbits Eat Blueberries?

a rabbit and vegetables

Rabbits can easily eat blueberries. In fact, blueberries are known to be able to help support the rabbit’s health especially if they are given the right amounts of it. Blueberries are known to contain minerals that can be used to help improve brain function as well as aid in the repair of damaged cells.

Although they are sweet and delicious, blueberries actually have a low glycemic value. This means that your rabbit can safely eat them without you having to worry too much about their sugar content. Of course, this does not mean that they can freely eat as many blueberries as they want.

Blueberries are also known to contain high amounts of antioxidants that you can use to help the rabbit get ample protection against free radicals or oxidative stress damage. The low glycemic value of blueberries will also help ensure that your rabbit will not get hyperactive or gain too much weight.

Things To Consider When Giving Blueberries To Rabbits

rabbit eating berries

Whenever you want to give blueberries to your bunnies, you might want to remove the seeds of the blueberry first. This can help the rabbit avoid choking and it can also help you avoid giving your rabbit unwanted chemicals which might be in the seed. But try not to fret if you gave your pet whole berries.

In most cases, the seeds are small enough to easily pass through the rabbit’s digestive tract without causing any health problems. As with all fruit treats, you need to give blueberries in moderation to your rabbits. Although they have a low glycemic index value, it can still suppress your rabbit’s appetite.

This means that if you give too much of it, your rabbit might no longer want to consume his or her regular diet. Giving too much blueberries can also lead to unexpected weight gain. You should also consider introducing it slowly to your rabbit’s diet so the pet can avoid diarrhea.

Conclusion

a rabbit eating watermelon

Blueberries are very nutritious since it is known to contain antioxidants, vitamins and minerals that can be used to help improve your rabbit’s health. Although they are very sweet and tasty, they have a low sugar content, allowing you to avoid making your pet hyperactive and preventing a sudden weight gain.

Nevertheless, you should give blueberries in moderation. Experts recommend that you only give 1 or 2 pieces per week so that you will not ruin the rabbit’s appetite for his or her regular food. Try to remove the seeds to avoid choking your pet and introduce it slowly so your rabbit will not get diarrhea.

Have you tried feeding blueberries to your own rabbits at home? Tell us more about your experience in the comment section.

About the Author Emily Taylor

My name is Emily Taylor, gardening is my passion and I’m looking forward to sharing it with everyone. I know that there are millions of people out there want their backyard and garden be attractive just like their front yard, so I am here to help you create your own backyard paradise.

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1 comment
Ca says May. 2018

I’m sorry, but I completely disagree with the statement below.
“Rabbits are one of the many pets that you can safely give to your kids simply because these animals are quite timid and friendly. They need very little maintenance and they would just stay happy for as long as they are given enough care and attention, which I’m sure that your kids might be very happy to oblige.”
Rabbits are prey animals and hate to be chased (children chase), picked up (all kids want to pick up cute little furries) or restrained (cuddling the furry after they have caught it) as in the wild the only time these things happen is when they are about to become another animal’s supper. Rabbits can inflict a nasty bite when feeling threatened, leading children and adults to believe they have an aggressive bunny, when actually they have just been terrified by mishandling. Also, as they are non-vocal animals, unlike a dog that can yelp/bark/growl, they can not give any warning of this, unless you get to know rabbit body language well which most children will not. These misunderstandings lead to so many lovely rabbits ending up in shelters due to “aggression”, when actually they are just trying to stay alive from their viewpoint.
Rabbits also need a lot of maintenence which children are notorious for not keeping up with after the novelty has worn off. If they need vet care it needs to be with a specialist vet, regular vaccinations and some breeds have regular issues needing treatment. They need cleaning out frequently, lots of space, company from another bonded rabbit and grooming including regular nail trimming and health checks by owners. You did mention limiting fruit and that their diet should be mostly hay, which i am grateful for as this is correct, and this diet does help prevent some health issues. I enjoyed the rest of this article but I am worried in case someone reads the part I mentioned above and buys a rabbit on a whim for their child, as rabbits are not a good children’s pet unless with constant supervision for enough hours for them to have the exercise and freedom they need daily. I would be grateful to you if you could reword this article to make it more accurate and potentially save a bunny from a life in a rescue shelter. Many thanks.

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